MENU

Traditional Foods

CLEANING HOUSE – BY REGULARLY DETOXIFYING

by Tammera J. Karr, PhD

An effective detoxification program will not ask you to make any dramatic lifestyle and dietary changes. Healthier food and lifestyle choices are generally made on a subconscious level. Once the body begins to eliminate toxins, it will naturally start craving foods that will nourish it at an optimum level. That said, there are undoubtedly many things you can do to maximize the benefits of the cleanse you’re on from day one, and certain foods will help maintain the benefits of the detox for much longer.

A detox diet is a short-term diet, often 3- to 21 days, focused on removing toxins from the body. Although detoxification is ongoing in the body, toxins and stress prevent us from doing it optimally, which eventually affects our health. A detox diet allows our bodies to focus on self-healing, with the goal being to raise energy levels, stimulate digestive health, clear headaches, remove bloating, improve concentration and mood, avoid getting allergies, regain our natural ability to ward off colds and flu and prevent premature aging and disease.

In natural health writings from the 1900’s, it was common to see articles on digestive cleansing with tonics, enemas, fasting, and herbs. Detoxification has been practiced for centuries by many cultures around the world — including Ayurvedic and Chinese medicine.

The sad but undeniable truth is many are living in an environment toxic to their bodies, take a look at the following information:

How does detoxification work?

Basically, detoxification means cleaning the blood. It does this by removing impurities from the blood in the liver, where toxins are processed for elimination. The body also eliminates toxins through the kidneys, intestines, lungs, lymph, and skin. However, when this system is compromised, impurities aren’t properly filtered, and every cell in the body is adversely affected.

Many health ailments–headaches, exhaustion, and muscle cramps–are coming from toxicity. Toxins have been implicated in everything from increased risk of Alzheimer’s and cardiovascular disease to mental retardation and cancer.

A detox program can help the body’s natural cleaning process by:

  1. Resting organs through fasting;
  2. Stimulating the liver to eliminate toxins;
  3. Promoting elimination through the intestines, kidneys, and skin;
  4. Improving circulation;
  5. Refuel the body.

10 ways to detoxify

  1. Eat plenty of fiber, including brown rice and organically-grown fresh fruits and vegetables. Beets, radishes, artichokes, cabbage, broccoli, spirulina, chlorella, and seaweed.
  2. Cleanse and protect the liver by taking dandelion root, burdock, milk thistle, and drinking green tea.
  3. Vitamin C helps produce glutathione, a liver compound that drives away toxins.
  4. Drink at least two quarts of filtered water daily.
  5. Breathe deeply to allow oxygen to circulate more completely through your system.
  6. Think positive thoughts.
  7. Practice hydrotherapy by taking a very hot shower for five minutes, allowing the water to run on your back. Follow with cold water for 30 seconds. Do this three times, and then get into bed for 30 minutes.
  8. Sweat in a sauna to eliminate wastes through perspiration.
  9. Dry-brush your skin or try detox foot spas/foot baths to remove toxins through your pores.
  10. Exercise, yoga, qigong, mini-tramps or jump-roping are good. One hour every day.

Don’t forget

Eliminate alcohol, coffee, cigarettes, refined and artificial sugars, fake fats found in margarine, and unfiltered tap water all of which act as toxins in the body and are obstacles to detoxifying. Also, minimize use of chemical-based household cleaners and personal health care products (cleansers, shampoos, deodorants, and toothpastes), and substitute natural alternatives.

Stress triggers your body to release stress hormones into your body affecting every metabolic pathway necessary for detoxification. While these hormones can provide the “adrenaline rush” to win a race or meet a deadline, in large amounts, they create toxins and slow down detoxification enzymes in the liver. Consider cutting out the news at dinner and bedtime add music that is around 60 beats per minute to calm the central nervous system throughout the day, all these are simple and effective ways to relieve stress.

People who are exhausted with low blood pressure may have adrenal weakness or fatigue. A detox diet is usually done after the adrenal glands have been replenished.

 

POMEGRANATE – TOP THREE SUPER FOOD

by Tammera J Karr, PhD

I love pomegranates, they are one of the few foods I can eat every day for months and never get tired of the flavor. When I was a kid, pomegranates were only available during the Christmas and New Year season in rural Eastern Oregon. Today they are available in fresh, cleaned seeds and juice forms almost year around. For those who grew up in southern California, you may have had a tree in your yard and remember the beautiful deep red jellies made by family members from the pomegranate fruit.

A little history

Pomegranate is one of the “seven kinds” mentioned in the Bible which Israel was blessed with long ago. An ancient legend, world religions, history and traditional medicine, have all celebrated the unique beauty and health benefits of the pomegranate. It is a fruit of legend and power – a sacred symbol of human civilization.

Mankind has revered the magical, mystical pomegranate since the dawn of recorded history. Ancient Greeks, Romans, and the peoples of China, India and the Middle East found its properties to be life-giving and invigorating.It grew in the region for thousands of years and is very much adapted to it. As befits a fruit with many seeds, the pomegranate is the traditional representation of fertility and seems to have its origins everywhere. The pomegranate was cultivated in Egypt before the time of Moses. It was found in the Indus valley so early that there is a word in Sanskrit for pomegranate.

The pomegranate is significant in Jewish custom. Tradition holds that a pomegranate has 613 seeds to represent the 613 commandments in the Torah. The design of the pomegranate was woven into the high priest’s robes, and brass representations were part of the Temple’s pillars. It is mentioned six times inch Song of Solomon.

The pomegranate tree is native from Iran to the Himalayas in northern India and has been cultivated since ancient times throughout the Mediterranean region of Asia, Africa, and Europe. The most important growing areas are Egypt, China, Afghanistan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Iran, Iraq, India, Burma and Saudi Arabia.

The tree was introduced in California by Spanish settlers in 1769. It is grown for its fruit mostly in the dry zones of that state and Arizona. In California, commercial pomegranate cultivation is concentrated in Tulare, Fresno, and Kern counties, with small farms in Imperial and Riverside counties.

Health Benefits

Pomegranate seeds get their vibrant red hue from polyphenols. These chemicals are potent antioxidants. Pomegranate juice contains higher levels of antioxidants than most other fruit juices. It also has three times more antioxidants than red wine and green tea. The antioxidants in pomegranate juice can help remove free radicals, protect cells from damage, and reduce inflammation.

The juice of a single pomegranate has more than 40 percent of your daily requirement of vitamin C. Vitamin C can be broken down when pasteurized, so opt for homemade or fresh pomegranate juice to get the most of the nutrient. In addition to vitamin C and vitamin E, pomegranate juice is an excellent source of folate, potassium, and vitamin K.

Pomegranate juice made a splash when researchers found it helped stop the growth of prostate cancer cells. The antioxidants in the juice and their high concentration are believed to stall the progress of Alzheimer disease and protect memory. Pomegranate juice can reduce inflammation in the gut and improve digestion. It may be beneficial for people with Crohn’s disease, ulcerative colitis, and other inflammatory bowel diseases.

Pomegranate juice is a potent anti-inflammatory due to its high concentration of antioxidants. The juice has been found to reduce inflammation throughout the body and prevent oxidative stress damage. Flavonols in pomegranate juice may help block inflammation that contributes to osteoarthritis and cartilage damage. The juice is currently being studied for its potential effects on osteoporosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and other types of arthritis and joint inflammation.

Pomegranate was traditionally used as a remedy for diabetes in the Middle East and India.

Researchers believe the effects of pomegranate on diabetes may help decrease insulin resistance and lower blood sugar.

Pomegranate juice is in the running as the most heart-healthy juice. It appears to protect the heart and arteries. Small studies have shown that the juice improves blood flow and keeps the arteries from becoming stiff and thick. It may also slow the growth of plaque and buildup of cholesterol in the arteries. Drinking pomegranate juice daily may lower systolic blood pressure.

Between the vitamin C and other immune-boosting nutrients like vitamin E, pomegranate juice can prevent illness and fight off infection. Pomegranates have also been shown to be antibacterial and antiviral in lab tests. They are being studied for their effects on common infections and viruses.

These are just a few of the benefits research is finding – soooo here is to superfoods with vibrant red!

 

Taking Back Control of your Health, order your Foundation Package Today

 

Sources

Ferreira, Mandy. “15 health benefits of pomegranate juice.” Medical News Today. MediLexicon, Intl., 12 Jul. 2017. Web.

12 Jan. 2018. https://www.medicalnewstoday.com/articles/318385.php

http://www.medicaldaily.com/pomegranate-health-benefits-fruit-helps-protect-against-plaque-hunger-and-certain-340020

http://nutritiondata.self.com/facts/fruits-and-fruit-juices/2038/2

http://maderachamber.com/pf/?page_id=67

http://www.pomegranatehealth.com/Pomegranate-Story_ep_7.html

https://www.hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/pomegranate.html

Holistic Nutrition News

Published January 31st, 2017 in Blog

Edition 20 -Vol1 2017

What are Lectins and are they bad for me?

What are “lectins” and why should you pay attention to them? Lectins are a protein that can bind to cell membranes. Lectins offer a way for molecules especially sugars, to stick together without getting the immune system involved, which can influence cell-cell interaction.

“In 1988 a hospital launched a “healthy eating day” in its staff canteen at lunchtime. One dish contained red kidney beans, and 31 portions were served. At 3 pm one of the customers, a surgical registrar, vomited in theater. Over the next four hours, 10 more customers suffered profuse vomiting, some with diarrhea. All had recovered by next day. No pathogens were isolated from the food, but the beans contained an abnormally high concentration of the lectin phytohaemagglutinin.”

Lectins are abundant in raw legumes (beans, peas, alfalfa, peanut, and lentils) grains, and most commonly found in the seed part which becomes the leaves when planted. Lectins are additionally found in dairy products and some vegetables. While lectin content in food is relatively constant, genetic modification has created level fluctuations in many legumes such as soy, alfalfa, wheat, corn, and rice.
A National Institutes of Health report published in the British Medical Journal April 1999 provides valuable information on the validity of reducing lectins in your diet. “Lectins are carbohydrate binding proteins present in most plants, especially seeds and tubers like cereals, potatoes, and beans. Until recently their main use was as histology and blood transfusion reagents, but in the past two decades we have realized that many lectins are (a) toxic, inflammatory, or both; (b) resistant to cooking and digestive enzymes, and (c) present in much of our food. It is thus no surprise that they sometimes cause “food poisoning.” However, the really disturbing finding came with the discovery in 1989 that some food lectins get past the gut wall and deposit themselves in distant organs.”

In plants, lectins are a defense against microorganisms, pests, and insects. The evolution of lectin formation in plants serves as a way for seeds to remain intact as they passed through animals’ digestive systems. Lectins are resistant to human digestion also especially in today’s world of compromised digestive microbiome, and they enter the blood unchanged. Any food component that passes through the digestive lining unaltered into the blood stream compromises our whole health. Current research has irrefutably linked the “Leaky Gut.” process with brain health.

With winter well upon us the levels of seasonal affective disorder (SAD), reduced immunity, and chronic inflammation are on the increase. This is the time of year we are most likely to feel our worst both mentally and physically and tempted by comfort food. A review published in Nutrients March 2013 describes lectins as “anti-nutrients” and a leading contributor to many health challenges.…. “Inflammation is the response of the innate immune system triggered by noxious stimuli, microbial pathogens, and injury. When a trigger remains, or when immune cells are continuously activated, an inflammatory response may become self-sustainable and chronic. Chronic inflammation has been associated with many medical and psychiatric disorders, including cardiovascular disease, metabolic syndrome, cancer, autoimmune diseases, schizophrenia, and depression.”

I encourage you to take control of your health in 2017 through change – if what you have been eating is making you less then your best – grab the bull by the horns and take it down and out of your life.

To Your Good Health in 2017

Sources
1. http://www.precisionnutrition.com/all-about-lectins
2. http://www.unexplainedinfertilityinfo.com/autoimmune-causes/
3. Gilbert RJ. Healthy eating day. Communicable Disease Report. 1988;33:3–4.
4. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1115436/#B1
5. http://www.bmj.com/content/318/7190/1023
6. Nutrients 2013, 5, 771-787; doi:10.3390/nu5030771
7. https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3705319/

 

Oh so easy Buckwheat Pancakes
This recipe comes from a longtime friend and mentor – Norm Michaels.

1 cup Bobs Red Mill Buckwheat flour
2 tsp baking powder
1 organic egg
1 ¼ cups raw milk, or milk substitute

Mix dry ingredients together
Lightly beat egg and milk together then add to dry ingredients, stir till mixed well.
Cook pancakes on a cast iron griddle or skillet – oil griddle with lard, bacon grease, olive oil or organic butter.
Serve with fruit compote or maple syrup.

If you have never made pancakes before I suggest you read the cooking step by step directions from a standard recipe before beginning.

 

Attention Clients
Effective October 4, 2016, all INNATE Response™ direct sales business will be fulfilled by Emerson Ecologic.
This means we are not able to provide these supplements to you through the Natural Partners virtual dispensary. Please note Innate Response is still Tammera’s Primary Product Line of Choice. Clinically this product line has outperformed, across the board, as a generalized support, for 85% of our clients.

Our amazing web team will be looking into setting up an Emerson Dispensary for your convenience.

Look for an update in your next Newsletter, or call the office 541-430-1078 to place your order with Tammera in person.

 

Up Coming Events

 

National Association Of Nutrition Professionals (NANP) 2017 Conference

May 4-7, 2017 Portland Waterfront Marriott Hotel

Tammera will be presenting on May 5

 

 

Spring with a splash of Easter color

DSCF0126

Wild Trillium in white phase. This is one of the earliest spring flowers to be found in the Pacific North West Forests, coming out around Easter and Spring equinox.

by Tammera J. Karr, PhD

The familiar dyed Easter egg, which annually rolls along lawns and frustrates little children armed with colored wicker baskets, is a carryover from the pagan holiday which preceded the Christian holy day.  Easter has a close association with food. The word comes from the Anglo-Saxon goddess of light and spring, Eostre, and special dishes were prepared in her honor so that the year would be endowed with fertility.

The egg figures into both Christian and Jewish springtime holidays. Egg-shaped confections are unique to Easter, and – until just over a century ago – found primarily in France.

People in central European have a long tradition of elaborately decorated eggs. Polish, Slavic, Russian and Ukrainian create intricate designs on the fragile eggs. Yugoslavian eggs bear the initials “XV” for “Christ is Risen,” a traditional Easter greeting. The Russians, during the reign of the tsars, celebrated Easter much more elaborately than Christmas, with Easter bread and special foods and decorated eggs given as gifts.

In Baltic Russia, the Easter cake kulich, made from a yeast dough of enormous proportions and lavishly decorated with crystallized citrus peel is a traditional food served during Easter. In traditional Baltic households, it is placed on a table decorated with painted eggs and the children of the family gather to share the eggs and bread.

The Pennsylvania Dutch imported the Easter Hare, who delivered colored eggs to good children. By the early nineteenth century; entire Pennsylvania Dutch villages would turn out with gaily decorated Easter eggs to play games, including egg-eating contests.

In Europe, there are traditions, not limited to Christian denominations, of eating the season’s new lamb, just coming onto the market. The roast lamb served on Easter Sunday began with the first Passover of the Jewish people.

Here are more healthy spring foods for you to enjoy.

Artichokes are a good source of protein, vitamin C, folate, potassium, and magnesium, and are a rich source of fiber. They also contain a compound called cynarin, extracts of which have been found to protect and regenerate the liver and regulate cholesterol levels.

Asparagus, a 100-gram portion of asparagus, contains three-quarters of the folate and a quarter of the vitamin C required each day. It is also a useful source of beta-carotene, vitamin E and potassium.

Broccoli is an excellent source of beta-carotene and vitamin C, and contains calcium, potassium, and folate – vital nutrients for immune health and strong bones. Broccoli is also rich in indole-3-carbinol (I3C). In preliminary research, I3C has been reported to affect oestrogen metabolism that protects against breast and other female cancers.

Cabbage is high in vitamin C and anti-cancer compounds; dithiolthiones, glucosinolates, indoles, isothiocyanates, coumarins and phenols, which work by enhancing the body’s ability to detoxify chemicals and by increasing antioxidant activity. Raw cabbage juice is documented for peptic ulcers. This is associated with a substance called S-methylmethionine, which promotes healing and relieves pain.

Leeks are surprisingly nutritious, providing a good source of many nutrients, including vitamins C and B6, folate, manganese, and iron.

Peas being legumes,  are higher in calories than most vegetables due to high carbohydrate content, they also contain protein and fiber are an excellent source of folate and vitamins A and C.

Radishes can be red, black or white. They are an excellent source of vitamin C and are noted to have a positive effect on the symptoms of colds and coughs.

Watercresses is a “superfood”,  brimming beta-carotene, vitamins B and C, calcium, and iron. Watercress is an excellent source of phytochemicals and is the richest source of phenethyl isothiocyanate, which provides the unique peppery flavor. In a number of studies, watercress has been shown to have potent anti-cancer properties.

Spring is a great time to try early greens available through the farmers markets,  as well as a traditional spring lamb.

 

To your good health and Happy Spring.

This is a great time to sign up for our newsletter!

Resources:

http://www.kievitskroon.co.za/news/easter-food-traditions-explained/

http://cadyluckleedy.com/tag/easter/

https://foodtimeline.org/easter.html

http://www.afamilyfeast.com/roasted-lamb-london-broil-style/

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Watercress

http://www.ion.ac.uk/information/onarchives/10springfoods

Personalized Consultations

Custom plans to help you with your health and nutritional goals.

Health Newsletter

Sign up for the health and wellness newsletter and get my "Taking Back Control of Your Health Through Dynamic Foods" ebook free!


Get my dynamic foods ebook free when you sign up for my monthly newsletter!